wolverine

Podicus Wrecks #37 – Fatal Attractions

In this week’s episode, Jacob sits J.R. and Anthony down to explain why 90’s-era X-Men crossovers were so awful using the one that cost Wolverine his metal and Magneto his brain, FATAL ATTRACTIONS!  There are deaths!  There are returns!  There are betrayals!  There are explosions!  By the end of this podcast, you will know that the story probably wasn’t as good as you thought it was.

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Logan review

Logan claw movie posterSince Hugh Jackman started playing Wolverine, we’ve had 3 different Spider-men, 2 Batmen, Chris Evans went from being a cocky Human Torch to being  Captain America, and people are questioning if there are too many comic book movies being released on a yearly basis.  When X-Men debuted in 2000, we were a few years removed from the debacle that was Batman & Robin.  There were no cinematic universes.  It was a different environment 17 years ago.

I do not remember there being much fanfare surrounding the release of X-Men.  I remember going to see it on a whim, even though that whim did happen to be on opening day.  But there was no reason to think then that we would still be talking about those actors playing those characters.  And while some have been replaced by younger versions since they went backwards in the timeline, there has been one constant.  Hugh Jackman has been Wolverine throughout.  That all comes to an end with Logan.  Logan is expected to be the final time Hugh Jackman portrays Wolverine on film.  I say “expected” because you should really never say never.

I say all of this, because I believe Logan works better when viewed as the swan song for Hugh Jackman as Wolverine, rather than as the next movie in a long line of X-Men movies.  It is easier to think of the movies in two distinct timelines.  You have the original timeline, which includes X-Men, X-Men 2, X-Men: The Last Stand, X-Men Origins: Wolverine, and The Wolverine.  Then there is the First Class timeline, which includes X-Men:  First Class, X-Men: Days of Future Past, and X-Men: Apocalypse.  Days of Future Past links the original cast with the First Class cast, but I think it is simpler to put it in the new timeline, since it retcons events in previous movies anyways.  Now, the question is where does Logan fit in.  The answer to that is a giant shrug.  They do not attempt to fit it in anywhere, and that is fine.  (more…)

Logan trailer

I don’t exactly know why I’m looking forward to this movie as much as I am, but I’m really looking forward to it.  Maybe it’s the thought that we may get something that passes for an actual ending to the story of Wolverine.  Or at least Hugh Jackman’s Wolverine.  With Days of Future Past, timelines have gotten a little jumbled, but I don’t really care what timeline we’re in, or even how we got here.  There are reports things may get rebooted anyways.  So, I really hope we get a nice end to Jackman’s Wolverine.  It really is amazing how many appearances he has made as Wolverine.  When they inevitably try to find someone younger to play Wolverine for the next however many movies, it is going to be difficult to replace Hugh Jackman.

Chuck Austen’s X-Men: Of Darkest Nights

A quick note before we begin.  The remaining chapters of Chuck Austen’s X-Men have been COMPLETED.  As in written (with images) and ready to post.  That means no more delays in further updates – there will be two updates next week and then the final chapter and a wrap-up the following week.  Thanks for sticking with it – it’ll be worth it!


443cover

Took Place In

Uncanny X-Men #442-443

Team Line-Up
Juggernaut, Polaris, Wolverine

Others You Should Be Aware Of
Emma Frost, Professor X, She-Hulk, Quicksilver, Scarlet Witch

In a Nutshell
Professor X takes the body of the slain Magneto back to Genosha and has a philosophical debate with Polaris while Wolverine tears down buildings.

Before we begin, I have to give a little bit of defense to our favorite writer, Chuck Austen. 2004 was a big transitional time for the X-Men. At the time, there were three X-Men books – one was considered the “flagship”, which carried the MAIN X-Men story – while the other two were basically secondary books for characters to appear who weren’t being used in the main book. And Wolverine of course, because Wolverine. The flagship book would get all the Wizard attention (remember Wizard?) while the secondary books were kind of left to their own, hoping that no one would notice. For X-Treme X-Men, it gave Chris Claremont room to do whatever he wanted, because he’s Chris Claremont and damn it, he earned it. As for Uncanny, Chuck Austen did…well, we’ve learned what Chuck Austen did.

But come 2004, suddenly the flagship hit a transitional period. Grant Morrison finished up his epic in New X-Men and headed off for the Distinguished Competition, and fanboy messiah Joss Whedon was set to come in and start his epic in the newly launched Astonishing X-Men – back when jumping on points were actually jumping on points. In the meantime, the rest of the X-Books got shuffled a bit. Both Uncanny and New had decently high numbers (back when that mattered) so X-Treme X-Men was ended and Claremont was brought back over and given Uncanny, which from a sales point made a lot of sense – Chris Claremont back in the book that he built. Glory. Chuck Austen was in turn pushed over to Morrison’s old title, given back it’s original name of simply “X-Men”. So all was good in the world. Whedon manned the flagship, and the others kept going.

Well, except that there was a two month gap between Morrison’s last issue and the big relaunch. That meant nothing for X-Treme X-Men – all it had to do was wrap up and get ready to jump. But for Uncanny and New X-Men, that meant two months of treading water, not able to start new stories because RELAUNCH. So in Marvel’s epic wisdom, they decided to give both books to Chuck Austen and said “do something for an epilogue”. But it wasn’t an epilogue to his own stories – no funeral for the Cabots to be seen. Instead, he got hampered with writing an epilogue to Grant Morrison’s finale of Planet X. (We’re going to ignore Here Comes Tomorrow). That meant Magneto and Phoenix dead, Charles Xavier leaving the school, and the school in ruins.

That by itself wasn’t too bad, but any X-fan worth their mettle is probably aware of the shenanigans that took place just after Morrison left Marvel. The entire run of Morrison’s X-Men had been the infiltration of Magneto into the X-Men following the destruction of Genosha. Then the climax hits and everyone’s mind is blown and we’re left with the aftermath…and Marvel decides “Nope, it was not actually Magneto” and brings him back a couple months later, with Professor X seemingly having known the entire time. It was a horrendous mess, and it hampered any kind of story dealing with it, because if Professor X knew, why would he be going through these motions here?

So in Chuck’s defense, that’s not his fault. This will also come up when we get to the return of Xorn. But enough of that. We’re not here to defend – we’re here to ridicule. So let’s go!

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Battle of the Atom

Since AvX ended, the main point of the X-Men world has been the arrival of the teenage versions of the original team in the present in what has to be one of the worst decisions in the X-Men mythos.  Worse than “let’s let the world believe us to be dead”.  In an attempt to make Cyclops realize how far he’s strayed, Beast pulls out not the family albums or videos, but rather himself and his teammates from the past.  The effort does not impress Cyclops at all, but for whatever reason when the kids decide to stick around in the present, no one really flags this as a bad idea.

Battle of the Atom is the story that gets around to addressing how awful an idea this whole thing is…well, actually it starts to, then quickly shoots off into time travel shenanigans, gratuitous fighting, trickery and shenanigans, then a HUGE BIG DEAL at the end that pretty much comes out of left field to make sure at least SOMETHING happens to justify the ten issue crossover.

In the sake of big, stupid fun, it’s perfectly acceptable.  There’s running around, happy moments, sad moments, and OMG reveals galore.  But in the sake of a bigger narrative, a storyline direction and characters making rational decisions and coming with ends/means life-altering decisions?  Not so much.

I’ll get into the deal after the jump.  Here’s hoping you’ve read it, because there will be SPOILERS WITHIN.

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X-Men goes gold

One of the things I’ve noticed about the whole aging process is that noteworthy anniversaries and celebrations seem to come with far more frequency than they did in the past.  Take, for example, Marvel celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the X-Men with this week’s release of X-Men: Gold.  My first reaction was that it couldn’t possibly be 50 years, as it seems like we were just writing up special commentaries on the 40th anniversary on the now-defunct X-Men site Mutatis Mutandis, of which I was a staff writer for.

And then I realized that 2003 was 10 years ago.  WOW.

But enough about me getting old.  We’re talking about an anniversary celebration here!

Coincidentally, half of these characters play little to no role in this book.

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