Top 5: Chuck Austen X-Men Moments

Interested in Chuck Austen’s X-Men?  Check out our ongoing journey through the muck!

This month, we’ll be looking at the Top 5 (used as sarcastically as possible) moments from Chuck Austen’s time on the X-Men!  Let’s begin!

5) Archangel and Husk get naked in front of Ma Guthrie
Throughout the 80’s and 90’s, Archangel became a far cry from the millionaire playboy he had been in his early appearances.  Blue skin, metal wings, brooding, depressed and a horrid lust for killing had made Warren Worthington something of a dull boy.  Already back to his feathered wings, Chuck Austen restored his white skin in his first story arc and then decided to work on getting Warren over the death of his ex-girlfriend Psylocke.  The obvious choice: Husk.  As in the kid sister of the member of the junior X-Men team brought in after Warren’s team had already been replaced by a newer team.  Does that scream creepy to anyone else?

It certainly did to Warren himself, who was torn on getting down and dirty with Husk, who we’ll say for decency sake was just on the legal side of the age of consent.  Husk was all about it, despite that Warren’s powers (including his now-forgotten healing blood) mirrored those of her brother Josh’s.  Finally, Husk broke through to Warren and the two embraced in front of their teammates and Husk’s mother.  Warren flew off, and suddenly down came Husk’s t-shirt, hitting her mother in the face.  The two had decided to go ahead and do whatever in clear view of Husk’s mother.  You could fairly guess that from that point on, Warren was not quite welcome in the Guthrie household.

Click for full-sized ewwwww.

I could go on about how awful She Lies with Angels was as a story, but I think that can wait for a spotlight on Austen’s entire run.  We’ll save it for after the Top 100 list.

4) Revealing the truth about the Xorns
Grant Morrison had introduced Xorn as a new character to the X-Men – a zen-focused mutant with a star for a head and healing powers.  The big reveal near the end of his run was that Xorn was actually Magneto in disguise, infiltrating the team, recruiting some students and decimating the team.  At the end of the story, Magneto killed Phoenix then lost his head to Wolverine.  It was an excellent story and solid end to the whole story.  Until, that is, that Marvel wanted to bring both Magneto and Xorn back.

I’m actually going to be lazy on this one and simply cut and paste what I had written in a feature on Xorn:

Xorn, in theory, would be simple to bring back.  As the original had seemingly been a creation of the villain, you could simply twist it to say that the Xorn identity was based on a real Xorn who was still himself locked up in China (where the Magneto one had been found).  Then the imposter villain used two identities of actual people to push his goal.  Yes, more of a cop out, but it still makes sense and allows you to have the character back in relatively the same state that the original had been in.  But I guess that would have made too much sense.

Instead, the Xorn that was found by Havok’s team of X-Men revealed himself to be the brother of the original Xorn that infiltrated the X-Men.  In a baffling line of dialogue, Emma Frost mentions that she doesn’t know if the new one shared the old one’s healing powers, but like the original’s ‘star for a head’, this one had a black hole for a head.  The writer of this drivel, the universally despised Chuck Austen, obviously didn’t read the original material, or he would have realized that the ‘original Xorn’ was not real.  He was a disguise used by someone impersonating Magneto.  How this got past the editors truly baffles.  So now, instead of having an impersonator disguising himself as both Xorn and Magneto, we have Xorn, disguised as Magneto, disguising himself as Xorn (himself) to infiltrate the X-Men.  And that’s what they went with.

The second Xorn ended Austen’s X-Men tenure by sucking all the loose ends of the plot into his black hole of a head and simply walking away.  He hasn’t been seen since.

3) Faking the Rapture
It became quite obvious very early on that Chuck Austen has some issues with the Catholic Church.  This came to a head in the story “Holy War” in which former villains the ‘Church of Humanity’ was toted back out and drastically changed and Nightcrawler was removed from the priest role that he had taken upon Chris Claremont’s return to the X-Men some four years before.  The story had also opened with the crucification of a number of X-Men b-listers including Jubilee and Magma as well as Skin and Jesse Bedlam, who did not survive the experience.  To make matters worse, the issue was only 99 cents, as Marvel had hoped to use it as a jumping on point for fans captured with the awesomeness of the recently released X2: X-Men United.

But aside from being offensive to the religious, Holy War featured one of the most ludicrous plots that I, a comic fan for nearly 20 years, can recall.  The Church of Humanity’s leader, earlier written as a religious zealot, was transformed into a former nun who had been sexually abused by a priest and was hellbent (get it?) on bringing down Catholicsm.  Their plan was to install Nightcrawler as the Pope, then force his image inducer to fail, revealing his devilish natural appearance to horrified Catholics.  At that moment, they would trigger the rapture making people fear that the end of times had come.  How that was supposed to bring down the church, especially once the people realized the world was NOT ending, was left to speculation.  It seemed more like an overly convoluted plot to get Nightcrawler killed.  Bastion had a much more effective and straightforward idea – punch him through the chest.

But what made this even MORE ludicrous was the means of faking the rapture.  How to make scores of people vanish into thin air?  Simple – use tainted communion wafers that, when triggered, disintegrated those who had injested them.  That’s right – disintegrating communion wafers.  That was the plan in the arc used to bring in new readers to the X-Men.  Bloody brilliant.

Oh, and in case you hadn’t caught it already, the Rapture is not a Catholic belief.  According to Wikipedia:

The Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodox churches, the Anglican Communion, as well as most Protestant Calvinist denominations have no tradition of a preliminary return of Christ and reject the doctrine, in part because they cannot find any reference to it among any of the early Church fathers and find its biblical foundation weak, and because of their rejection of the 19th-century concept of dispensationalism.[20] Some also reject it because they interpret prophetic scriptures in either an amillennial or postmillennial fashion.

You can see the flaws in the plan.

2) The Wedding of Havok and Polaris
Almost since the characters debuted in the 1960’s, Havok and Polaris had been a couple.  They were largely defined by their relationship with one another through their entire existenses.  So when Havok was chucked into an alternate reality at the close of X-Factor, it left Polaris rather aimless for a while.  When Austen took over Uncanny, one of his first acts was to get Havok back into the mainstream, but unfortunately brought with him the rather horrid character of Nurse Annie, who fell in love with Havok for no reason other than he was a cute coma patient.  I think there was something about mental manipulation on the part of her far-too-young-to-have-mutant-powers son, too.

But of course with Havok back, it would only be a matter of time before Polaris showed up too, right?  But in her spare time, Polaris had been present for the destruction of Genosha, which had driven her ker-aaaaaaazy!  But to Chuck Austen, insanity caused by witnessing a horrifically traumatic experience translated into Polaris acting like a horny jerk who didn’t mind if people saw her naked.  Now jealous of the nurse who had a crush on Havok, she insisted he marry her and the wedding that was decades in the making came to pass.  Until Havok realized that he loved the nurse he barely knew (who just happened to have recently nailed Iceman), that is, and left Polaris at the altar.  This caused the horny jerk to become a violent, horny jerk and Polaris attacked all of the X-Men present until Havok eventually talked her down.  She was in a miserable story – she’d just have to deal with it.

When Austen handed over writing reins to Peter Milligan, Nurse Annie was one of the first things to go.  Havok and Polaris slowly began moving back together until finally, during Ed Brubaker’s run, they finally became a couple again.  As for Lorna’s craziness?  That vanished with Austen as well.  Strangest thing.

1) The Draco (that’s right – all of it)
What was the greatest X-Men story never told?  Proteus’s first steps?  How Unus the Untouchable came back to life after suffocating in his own force field (before he again suffocated in his own force field)?  No, no.  It would of course be just who knocked up Mystique with that little fuzzy blue elf Nightcrawler.  That was the thought of Chuck Austen when he set out with the Draco, a six part epic (plus prologue) to solve that mystery…and I say epic only in the scale of how much the story sucked.  Seriously, it sucked really, really hard.  But that’s kind of the point of it being here, so I’ll take you through it.

Nightcrawler’s father turned out to be this demon-ish guy named Azazel (one of the 30 or so Marvel U guys that claim to be what Christians think as the Devil) who lived in the “fire and brimstone” world that Nightcrawler travels through when he teleports (according to some writers).  Azazel doesn’t enjoy living in the “fire and brimstone” world, so he hatches a fiendishly clever plan: he’ll breed a stock of mutant teleporters who will eventually all come together and open a big portal which will allow Azazel to come through to Earth.  So with plan in hand, he travels to Earth and begins breeding teleporters.

Did you catch the flaw there?  TO OPEN A PORTAL TO COME TO EARTH, AZAZEL TRAVELS TO EARTH TO BREED TELEPORTERS.  My favorite sum up of this ridiculous pile came from Paul O’Brien’s X-Axis:

I’m reminded of something which, I think, was one of the Baron Munchausen stories.  The Baron is going out hiking.  He’s fully equipped for the mountains.  But alas, he’s so busy looking at the mountains that he doesn’t see where he’s going, and he falls down a well.  He tries to get out by throwing his grappling hook up to the top of the well, but the well is too deep and the hook won’t reach.  He tries to climb the walls, but they’re too slippery.  And he cries for help, but nobody hears.  Finally, having exhausted every other option, he goes home and gets a ladder.

But that didn’t come until the V of VI issue in a seven part story.  It was equally bad leading up to that.  First, we had the reveal that most of the mutant teleporters were all half brothers.  This forced a dramatic re-design of the character of Abyss to the point that he was unidentifiable until somebody got around to mentioning his name on panel.  Then we had Nightcrawler get his hands mangled in the teleportation ritual, only to be healed by having Archangel bleed on him (yup).  Then, most of the X-Men sit around doing nothing, including the recently returned Jubilee who began talking with constant “like” sentences and being a ditzy airhead.  Then you have the scene where Iceman gets shattered, so they carry around his head (still alive) until Havok comes up with the idea to pee him a new body.  The idea was so horrible (not to mention impossible) that it was thrown out the next issue and Iceman eventually absorbed the water out of another’s body (tossing out the long-held X-Men don’t kill ideal), because he can apparently do that.

In the background, we have the ongoing storyline that Polaris is crazy (for no real reason) but then she gets over it and comes to the rescue, opening a deus-ex portal inside of Abyss and yanking everyone through.  That topples Azazel and his fortress into a giant vortex, vanquishing the villain.  Except that the vortex presumebly led to Earth, which means Azazel got exactly what he wanted.  Oh, and we also had a subplot where Juggernaut went looking for his little fish buddy only to be confronted by a redesigned Alpha Flight.  And let me tell you, you haven’t seen awesome until you’ve seen Sasquatch in tech armor.

So what did we get out of the Draco, besides seven wasted months of Uncanny X-Men?  Nightcrawler is the son of the “devil” and is the half-brother of Abyss, despite no resemblence before this story.  His father has a plan that completely ignores his given ability to already complete it, and Havok thinks that he can pee enough water to constitute a human body.  And this, to my knowledge, is the worst story ever published in an X-Men title, making it the Top Chuck Austen Moment Ever!

See you next month.

Want more?  Check out the Comicdom Wrecks! feature Chuck Austen’s X-Men!

Advertisements

17 comments

  1. Yeah I am a big fan of Nightcrawler and really disliked the direction the whole Draco storyline went into.
    I really imagine the thought process of that story as some shitty chat near the water cooler at marvel.
    “Hey I know! I’ll have Nightcrawler be the son of the devil! we can easily milk 7 issue run out of that”.
    The whole character premise is was this mutant who looked LIKE a demon coming to terms with himself religiously and in the eyes of other people who feared him due to his appearence.
    If you actually MAKE the guy’s father Satan you kinda undo all the hardship and bias Nightcrawler had to suffer through all those years. What does Nightcrawler do now? go back to everyone who called him a “Demon” and say “Hey well you know funny story… turns out you f**king nailed it right on the head there”.

    Like

    1. I never thought of it that way… I just always thought it was an interesting premise; Kurt’s father being a demon/the Devil. But I guess that’s just because it’s so COOL! I mean, who do you think would have been a better choice for his father?

      Like

      1. I thought that linking Nightcrawler’s heritage to the dimension he teleported through (hence the sulfur and brimstone stench) was fine, and even using a demon to explain his appearance was okay, though I know a lot of people didn’t.

        Like

  2. From what I recall, Austen later said that he was ordered to do the Xorn story. I don’t recall if he gave any details, but I think he did say that he was told to do the Xorn was pretending to be Magneto pretending to be Xorn part?

    There was bad blood between Morrison and Marvel by the end of Morrison’s run, to the point of negative statements being made publicly. After Morrison left, there seemed to be a fairly directed effort to reverse parts of Morrison’s stories. I think that is why Austen’s Xorn story made it into print. Remember that at the same time Austen was writing that Morrison’s Magneto was really Xorn all along, Chris Claremont was writing his own version of a “Get Out of Jail Free” card for Magneto involving people mysteriously being unable to recognize Magneto and some potential conspiracy on Xavier’s part. That story in turn was killed unfinished due to House of M.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. As I remember, Austin got told “Xorn as a character was worth money. Bring him back.” Austin went away to think about it, and came back saying “I got nothing. I can think of no way to bring him back that isn’t stupid” Editorial said “then write something stupid.”

    As for Claremonts writng people unable to recognize Magneto, that was actually a consequence of Morrisons story. Which hinged on Magnetos plan for infiltrating the X-men involving locking himself up in China on the off chance the X-men would come around and free him, refusing to join when asked on the off chance they would come back and ask again, and when he finally joined, just assume Wolverine and Beast wouldn’t recognize him by smell.

    Like

    1. ‘As I remember, Austin got told “Xorn as a character was worth money. Bring him back.” Austin went away to think about it, and came back saying “I got nothing. I can think of no way to bring him back that isn’t stupid” Editorial said “then write something stupid.”’

      if this is true, my respect-o-meter for austen has gone from 1/10 to 2/10. simply because that’s hilarious.

      Like

  4. I guess it’s been quite some time since you read Morrison’s X-Men?
    No matter if it was Xorn or Magneto they were being manipulated by the drug Kick which was JOHN SUBLIME – the Creator of Weapon Plus – that wanted Mutant Hysteria to rise so he could take over the world.
    Xorn pretending to be Magneto makes perfect sense after being manipulated. Magneto is the face of Mutant Terrorism. why wouldn’t he pretend to be him when killing innocent civilians?

    Like

    1. No, Xorn pretending to be Magneto would have worked fine. But having Xorn pretending to be Magneto, pretending to be Xorn is silly. The reveal that Xorn was Magneto was awesome – and having a fake Magneto is disappointing, but still works.

      My point was that the new Xorn could simply have been the actual Xorn which the fake Magneto was also impersonating. Fake Magneto, fake Xorn. Revealing him to be a brother instead undermined the original point. Needing suppositions to make plots work is not the sign of a solid story.

      So, no, it hasn’t been a while, nor do I think it was a good idea.

      Like

      1. “But having Xorn pretending to be Magneto, pretending to be Xorn is silly.”
        But it wasn’t like that. It was Sublime in Xorn’s body pretending to be Magneto or Sublime pretending to be Xorn pretending to be Magneto.

        The point is that it doesn’t matter if if was really Xorn or really Magneto because they were being controlled by John Sublime. The person (whomever) was not in charge, but Sublime was.

        So you can either;
        Consider the possability that Magneto somehow saved himself from Genosha, got hooked on Kick (which is Sublime’s essance) and becomes what everyone thinks of him – a monster.
        OR
        Xorn, a quiet peace loving Mutant, gets hooked on Kick via Stepford Cuckoos and takes on the identity of the Osama Bin Laden of Mutantdom (who everyone also thinks is dead).

        Either way, it’s perfect. And if you understand Sublime – it’s not a bad idea for a story.

        Obviously, I would have preferred the real Xorn to have been found in China. But his brother works just as well seeing that the character was never used again after that anyways.

        Like

  5. You’re defending Grant Morrison’s story here, and I’m all for that. I agree that both of your scenarios are good. The first being Morrison’s original intent and the latter being the obvious explanation for Chris Claremont revealing Magneto to be alive and well in Genosha. The real Xorn was a fabrication created to infiltrate the X-Men, then the guise of Magneto was then used to rally mutants behind him. All is well and good, though the original story is a bit deflated.

    The problem comes with the edict to bring back Xorn, which in fairness to Austen was apparently pushed upon him by editorial. Suddenly you have to have a real Xorn outside the imposter who can’t be used because he’s all decapitated and whatnot.

    There would be an easy way out. Have there be a real, actual Xorn. Since the imposter Sublime entity already was going to impersonate Magneto, why not impersonate Xorn, an actual mutant, in a similar situation to infiltrate the X-Men? Then, once the imposter’s out of the way – BAM! you find the real Xorn just like you found the real Magneto. Then all you have to do is explain who the imposter was, and that can be pushed down for another story.

    And thus you don’t have two Xorns. One Xorn, one Magneto, one imposter who impersonated them both. Instead, they gave us one Xorn who decided to impersonate Magneto who impersonated himself in order to infiltrate the X-Men and said that even though the storyline suggested against it, actually did have healing powers and a star for a head. Then they provided a twin brother, a second Xorn, who was so awful he did absolutely nothing then vanished.

    Like

  6. I don’t really understand why there’s so much hate and opposition to Austen’s work on the Uncanny X-Men series. I actually really loved the series myself. Then again: I love Nightcrawler. And to me this series put him in such a dramatic and important role that I really loved it. And I also thought some of the jokes were funny. But I can see why there is a lot of hate for the series:
    Why is Angle not blue anymore?
    Why are there so many loop holes?
    What’s with all the romantic drama?
    Can someone please explain to me how Polaris’s personality completely changes(from bitch to crazy-bitch)?
    Hello Annie…. What are you doing here? (I can’t complain though, I really liked Annie in the story)
    Why does Conner have powers at, like, 7?
    And my biggest question/disappointment:
    WHY DID YOU GET RID OF STACY X!?!?!?! She was like the coolest character ever! You make her go away just as she’s starting to get really cool??? And you replace her, basically, with Paige? Cute but, no.
    But again: I really did love his work. For no other reasons than: Nightcrawler and Juggernaut. I mean, c’mon. You can’t tell me the idea of Juggernaut trying to be a better man isn’t an interesting concept. Plus he does tackle some interesting ideas out there. But don’t get me wrong. I don’t think he’s the greatest writer out there, that title is reserved for Neil Gaimen and Neil Gaimen only (and Garth Ennis). Just… he’s not that bad. After all, he got YOU guys to read all of 6 different volumes of work.
    I think Chuck Austin’s work should be re-taken and revised by a different author. One who can change the story plots so that they not only make more sense but also so that they have better flow and blending to them. It’s more like Chuck Austen’s work is the rough draft that got published before the finished, perfect product.

    Like

    1. “I don’t really understand why there’s so much hate and opposition to Austen’s work on the Uncanny X-Men series. I actually really loved the series myself.”

      When the run first came out, I didn’t so much hate it, nor do I really hate it now so much as ridicule it mercilessly. There’s just so much stuff in here that comes off as ludicrous, from dissolving communion wafers to the next breed of mutantkind being werewolves who could only speak in repeating single words. There were a lot of good plans there, sure, but the execution didn’t work.

      “Then again: I love Nightcrawler. And to me this series put him in such a dramatic and important role that I really loved it.”

      I also am a huge Nightcrawler fan, but I think his time with Austen completely undermined what had been so long established. When I think dramatic and important for the elf, I think Warren Ellis’s run on Excalibur where he was a confident and effective leader. Here his self-doubt and falling out of his religious fate was not at all in line with the character which put him in a negative light with longtime fans.

      “And I also thought some of the jokes were funny.”

      To each their own, I suppose.

      “But I can see why there is a lot of hate for the series:
      Why is Angle not blue anymore?”

      The loss of the blue didn’t actually bother me. It was the development of a healing factor that required him to bleed into open wounds to make use of it.

      “Why are there so many loop holes?”

      That’s an issue.

      “What’s with all the romantic drama?”

      The drama didn’t bother me – after all it’s what the X-Men were built upon in Chris Claremont’s original run. It’s rather how women were portrayed. Annie and Polaris were there simply to fawn over Havok while he pushed on with whatever he was doing. Stacy X and Husk did nothing but drool over Archangel. Even Northstar spent his original time doing nothing but sheepishly crushing on Iceman.

      “Can someone please explain to me how Polaris’s personality completely changes(from bitch to crazy-bitch)?”

      The idea was the horrific tragedy of Genosha, and Lorna’s always been a little flaky (refer to Peter David’s 90’s X-Factor book). But you’re right – she’s such an unlikable “bitch” that’s impossible to feel sorry for her when her tragedy plays out. She was introduced to be the antagonist of Nurse Annie, seemed to only be about Havok to make Annie jealous (see Austen and Women) and it didn’t help that she stuck around.

      “Hello Annie…. What are you doing here? (I can’t complain though, I really liked Annie in the story)”

      Annie’s introduction wasn’t too bad and I liked that she had her little clique of friends. My problem is that she was introduced to have this huge secret dealing with her hating of mutants yet it was abandoned in favor of her fawning over Havok. She was bumbling and rather unlikable to me, and she was more of a major character than half of Austen’s roster. Imagine in the 80’s if Stevie Hunter had gotten more panel space than Colossus and Nightcrawler.

      “Why does Conner have powers at, like, 7?”

      Never explained. See comments on Annie’s backstory.

      “And my biggest question/disappointment:
      WHY DID YOU GET RID OF STACY X!?!?!?! She was like the coolest character ever! You make her go away just as she’s starting to get really cool??? And you replace her, basically, with Paige? Cute but, no.”

      Wow, you may be the only person I’ve met with a love for Stacy X. I thought Stacy had potential and like Chamber she vanished with little to no explanation. Unfortunately, Austen immediately made her a bitter crushing schoolgirl who yelled out stuff like “I’m going to go watch porn” instead of making her remotely sympathetic in her role in the book. Why would anyone want Stacy to land Archangel instead of Husk? And since that’s all women did in Austen’s book, that’s all she was good for.

      “But again: I really did love his work. For no other reasons than: Nightcrawler and Juggernaut. I mean, c’mon. You can’t tell me the idea of Juggernaut trying to be a better man isn’t an interesting concept.”

      You’ve got me there. I think villain redemptions are pretty cool if done well, and I loved the relationship between Juggernaut and Sammy the Fish Boy, especially since it tied back to Cain’s own suffering at the hands of his abusive father and the feeling of helplessness that it entailed. I was actually kind of bummed when years later they hit the reset button and put him back as horrible asshole.

      ” Plus he does tackle some interesting ideas out there. But don’t get me wrong. I don’t think he’s the greatest writer out there, that title is reserved for Neil Gaimen and Neil Gaimen only (and Garth Ennis). Just… he’s not that bad. After all, he got YOU guys to read all of 6 different volumes of work.”

      Like I said, it wasn’t so much the ideas he went after, but the execution. For example – Holy War. The basic concept is that people do horrible things in the name of religion. That concept is what gave us the likes of God Loves, Man Kills. But in the execution he had Nightcrawler doubting his faith (something the character would never do because of the actions of others), a plot in which the western world crumbles because a religious event that is not a part of said religion’s beliefs, and a villain who’s reasons for doing her actions aren’t explained until the last page of the follow-up. And that’s not even the worst of it. So to your comment, I disagree. He was that bad.

      As for getting me to read all 6 volumes, I’m not a good example to go by. I’m a completist – I read everything and use this blog to try to explain why I didn’t like it if that’s the case. If I hadn’t bought his run, I would have a big hole in my collection of Uncanny X-Men, and I pride myself on having every issue from #180 to the final issue in the mid-500’s (and the rest in reprint volumes). I also have gotten a lot of comments from people who have used my in-depth feature as a substitute for having to read it.

      “I think Chuck Austin’s work should be re-taken and revised by a different author. One who can change the story plots so that they not only make more sense but also so that they have better flow and blending to them.”

      There’s an idea I’ve never really thought about. Redoing an entire run with another creative team. I’ve seen moments tossed in and reworked, but never an entire run. I doubt Marvel would ever do something like that, but it’s certainly an idea for a fan team, unless they got a cease-and-desist for using trademarked characters.

      ” It’s more like Chuck Austen’s work is the rough draft that got published before the finished, perfect product.”

      I could see that argument. A running theme I’ve had with his run is that the X-Office editors should have stopped some of it before it made it out, but then again I don’t know everything they do. Sometimes it seems like nothing. But yes, had there been a little more interaction on the product and cleaning up, it may have saved Austen a lot of heartache.

      Like

  7. You described Polaris so wrong. Polaris became a bad@ss at her wedding. The crazy part is what you didn’t clarify. She wanted to married Havok to forget all the crab she’s been through and she went ballistic because she found out she was Magneto’s daughter. If you think Chuck Austen is a bad writer, wait till you see Christ Claremont. He’s even worst.

    Like

    1. Getting married in order to cover up all the bad things that are going on in your life is quite possibly the worst reason I could ever think to get married. That is why people rush to marriage and get divorced just as quickly. The point is that you should be at a point where the man and woman are together on their path – Havok and Polaris obviously were not. They were just getting married because they had been together forever. The crazy part is that she didn’t have a certain kind of broken thought process brought upon by a horrific event, instead, it just made her be an asshole so everyone would like Annie more. That’s writing from someone that doesn’t understand how human emotions work outside of their own.

      You scoff at the Lord Chris Claremont? His original stuff in the 70’s and 80’s was incredible. Some of the best comics I’ve ever read. His stuff in the 2000’s and beyond? A lot of bad ideas thrown around in the same old way.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s